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Brimob personnel sent to C Papua’s Dogiyal to reinforce security 

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https://en.antaranews.com/news/260013/brimob-personnel-sent-to-c-papuas-dogiyal-to-reinforce-security

 14/11/22

 10 hours ago

Jayapura, Papua (ANTARA) – Two platoons of the Indonesian Police’s Mobile Brigade (Brimob) personnel have been deployed to Dogiyal, Central Papua, to reinforce security personnel following a riot, police said.

“Two platoons of Brimob (personnel) have departed from Nabire to reinforce security personnel in Dogiyal,” Chief of the Dogiyal District Police Commissioner Samuel Tariratu said on Sunday.

The riot occurred after a truck hit a five-year-old child, causing an angry mob to set two trucks on fire, he said while on his way to Dogiya.


Related news: Home minister inaugurates acting governors of new provinces in Papua


The mob also set blaze to 82 homes and six offices including, the employment agency (BKD), regional inspectorate office, population and civil registration office, environment office and finance office.

The riot also prompted local residents to take refuge at the district police office and district military command station in Dogiyal, he said.

Taritatu confirmed a report of people going missing following the riot.

Related news: Indonesian home minister inaugurates three new provinces in Papua

“Security personnel are still trying to find the whereabouts of the people who have reportedly not returned to their family,” he said.

An angry mob set fire to a truck believed to have hit a five-year child in Kebo. village, Kamu sub-district, Dogiyal district, Central Papua, on Saturday (November 12, 2022).

The child was killed in the accident.


Related news: Mahfud MD sanguine about continued improvement in Papuans’ welfare

Related news: Six villages in West Papua getting round-the-clock power: official

Reporter: Evarukdijati, Suharto
Editor: Fardah Assegaf

Police fire tear gas inside USTJ campus to disperse rally 

———————————https://en.jubi.id/police-fire-tear-gas-inside-ustj-campus-to-disperse-rally/ 3) Police fire tear gas inside USTJ campus to disperse rally  News Desk – Disbandment Of Demonstrations13 November 2022 

Jayapura, Jubi – Police dispersed the 22nd commemoration of the assassination of Papua Presidium Council leader Theys Hiyo Eluay held by students at the Jayapura University of Science and Technology (USTJ) in Jayapura City on Thursday, November 10, 2022.

Police fired tear gas, beat students and lecturers, and arrested a number of students who gave speeches and raised the Morning Star flag.USTJ vice rector III Isak Rumbarar said he was kicked in the chest by police. At the time, Rumbarar was trying to prevent clash between students and police. Rumbarar said the police fired tear gas at the students.“The security forces came in fully armed. More forces entered the campus and that only made the students angry. The police issued warning shots and fired tear gas at the students and they dispersed,” Rumbarar said.Rumbarar said he had listened to the speeches delivered by students at the commemoration. According to him, the students spoke about human rights violations that occurred in the Land of Papua. The students also stated that they rejected the dialogueattempt initiated by the National Commission on Human Rights (Komnas HAM).Rumbarar said that there had been various protests held by USTJ students but never once violent dispersal by the police such as happened on Thursday. “On this campus, there are often rallies but nothing like what happened today,” he said.He hopes that USTJ students can return to class on Friday. He will also take care of the seven students who were arrested by the police.“I will go to the police station to provide clarification for the students who have been taken by the police,” he said.Jayapura City Police Operations Section chief Adj. Comr. MBY Hanafi said the use of tear gas in the dispersal of the 22nd commemoration against the murder of Theys Hiyo Eluay was in accordance with procedure.“The security forces fired tear gas to disperse the crowd and it was according to Standard Operating Procedure,” Hanafi told Jubi when at the university on Thursday.Hanafi said they also arrested nine students of the Jayapura University of Science and Technology. They were arrested after raising two Morning Star flags and delivering political speeches. Hanafi emphasized that raising the Morning Star flag is prohibited by the State. (*)

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The rest of the world accounts for 42% of global fossil CO₂ emissions, and this is expected to grow by 1.7% this year.

Indonesia, Brazil and the Democratic Republic of the Congo contribute 58% of global CO₂ emissions from net land-use change.

https://theconversation.com/global-carbon-emissions-at-record-levels-with-no-signs-of-shrinking-new-data-shows-humanity-has-a-monumental-task-ahead-193108

Global carbon dioxide emissions from all human activities remain at record highs in 2022, and fossil fuel emissions have risen above pre-pandemic levels, according to a new analysis by an international body of scientists.

The analysis, by the Global Carbon Project, calculates Earth’s “carbon budget”, which is how much CO₂ humans have released, and how much has been removed from the atmosphere by the oceans and land ecosystems. From there, we calculate how much carbon can still be emitted into the atmosphere before Earth exceeds the crucial 1.5℃ global warming threshold.

This year, the world is projected to emit 40.6 billion tonnes of CO₂ from all human activities, leaving 380 billion tonnes of CO₂ as the remaining carbon budget. This amount of emissions is disastrous for the climate – at current levels, there is a 50% chance the planet will reach the 1.5℃ global average temperature rise in just nine years.

We’ve seen significant progress towards decarbonisation and emission reduction from some sectors and countries, particularly in renewable electricity generation. Yet, as world leaders gather for the COP27 climate change summit in Egypt this week, the overall global effort remains vastly insufficient.

Humanity must urgently cut global emissions if we are to retain any hope of averting the most catastrophic impacts of climate change.

https://images.theconversation.com/files/493661/original/file-20221106-52309-e3mlth.png?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&q=45&auto=format&w=754&fit=clip

Carbon budgets to 1.5°C, 1.7°C and 2°C global mean temperature, with emissions remaining of 380 billion tonnes CO₂, 730 billion tonnes CO₂, and 1,230 billion tonnes CO₂, respectively. These will be consumed in 9, 18 and 30 years if current emissions persist, starting in 2023. Global Carbon Project 2022

Coal and oil emissions up, gas down, deforestation slowing

Based on preliminary data, we project that CO₂ emissions from coal, natural gas, oil, and cement use (fossil emissions) will increase by 1% in 2022 from 2021 levels, reaching 36.6 billion tonnes. This means 2022 fossil emissions will be at an all-time high, and slightly above the pre-pandemic levels of 36.3 billion tonnes in 2019.

Let’s put the 2022 growth of 1% (or around 300 million metric tonnes) into perspective:

  • it’s the equivalent to adding an extra 70 million US cars to the world’s roads for a year
  • it’s higher than the 0.5% average yearly growth of the last decade (2012-2021)
  • but it’s smaller than the 2.9% average yearly growth during the 2000s (which was largely due to China’s rapid economic growth)
  • it’s also smaller than the 2.1% average yearly growth of the last 60 years.

So, in relative terms, the global growth in fossil CO₂ emissions is at least slowing down.


Read more: It’s the big issue of COP27 climate summit: poor nations face a $1 trillion ‘loss and damage’ bill, but rich nations won’t pay up


The growth in fossil emissions this year is largely due to higher oil and coal use – particularly oil, as the aviation industry is strongly bouncing back from the pandemic.

Coal emissions have also increased this year in response to higher natural gas prices and shortages in natural gas supply. Unexpectedly, there is the possibility that coal emissions this year will be higher than the historical peak in 2014.

Another major source of global CO₂ emissions is land-use change – the net balance between deforestation and reforestation. We project 3.9 billion tonnes of CO₂ will be released overall this year (though we should note that data uncertainties are higher for land-use change emissions than for fossil CO₂ emissions).

While land-use change emissions remain high, we’ve seen a slight decline over the past two decades largely due to increased reforestation. Rates of deforestation worldwide, however, are still high.

Together, fossil fuel and land-use change are responsible for 40.6 billion tonnes of CO₂.

https://images.theconversation.com/files/493981/original/file-20221107-21-jd8qq0.png?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&q=45&auto=format&w=754&fit=clip

Global fossil and land-use change CO₂ emissions (Gigatons of CO₂ = billion tons of CO₂). Global Carbon Project 2022

Nations responding to multiple turmoils

The US and India are responsible for the largest increases in CO₂ fossil emissions this year.

US emissions are projected to increase by 1.5%. While natural gas and oil emissions are higher, emissions from coal continue on a long downward trend. India’s fossil CO₂ emissions are projected to increase by 6%, largely due to an increase in coal use.

Meanwhile, CO₂ emissions from fossil fuel sources in China and the European Union are projected to decline this year by 0.9% and 0.8%, respectively.


Read more: Tensions and war undermine climate cooperation – but there’s a silver lining


China’s decline is mainly due to the nation’s continuing pandemic lockdowns, which have subdued economic activity. This includes a marked slowdown in the construction sector and its associated lower cement production.

Russia’s invasion of Ukraine is projected to lead to a 10% decline in the European Union’s CO₂ emissions from natural gas in 2022, as a result of supply shortages. The gas shortage has been partially replaced with greater coal consumption, leading to an increase of 6.7% in coal emissions in Europe.

The rest of the world accounts for 42% of global fossil CO₂ emissions, and this is expected to grow by 1.7% this year.

Indonesia, Brazil and the Democratic Republic of the Congo contribute 58% of global CO₂ emissions from net land-use change.

https://images.theconversation.com/files/493665/original/file-20221106-23-o9f8cw.png?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&q=45&auto=format&w=754&fit=clip

Global fossil CO₂ emissions from the top emitters and the rest of the world, with preliminary estimates for 2022 (GtCO₂ = billion tons of CO₂). Source: Friedlinsgtein et al. 2022; Global Carbon Project 2022.

Natural carbon sinks get bigger, but feel the heat

Ocean and land act as CO₂ sinks. The ocean absorbs CO₂ as it dissolves in seawater. On land, plants absorb CO₂ and and build it into their trunks, branches, leaves and soils.

This makes ocean and land sinks a crucial part of regulating the global climate. Our data shows that on average, land and ocean sinks remove about half of all CO₂ emissions from human activities, acting like a 50% discount on climate change.


Read more: No more excuses: restoring nature is not a silver bullet for global warming, we must cut emissions outright


Despite this help from nature, the concentration of atmospheric CO₂ continues to climb. In 2022 it’ll reach a projected average of 417.2 parts per million. This is 51% above pre-industrial levels and higher than any time in the past 800,000 years.

Carbon sinks are getting larger because there is more CO₂ in the atmosphere for them to absorb. And yet, the impacts of climate change (such as overall warming, increased climate extremes, and changes in ocean circulation) have made land and ocean sinks, respectively, 17% and 4% smaller than they could have grown during 2012-2021.

River meandering through a forest

Carbon sinks, such as rainforests, absorb half the CO₂ emissions released by human activities. Ivars Utinans/Unsplash, CC BY

There’s been significant progress this year in deployment of renewable energy, policy development, and commitments from governments and corporations to new, more ambitious climate mitigation targets.

We must urgently reach net-zero CO₂ emissions to keep global warming well below 2℃ this century. But humanity’s massive emissions in 2022 underscores the monumental and urgent task ahead.

Police arrest 7 students for flying Morning Star flag at campus rally in Abepura

T

Tribune Papua – November 10, 2022

Papuan students hold Morning Star flags on grouds of USTJ campus – November 10, 2022 (Istimewa

Aldi Bimantara, Jayapura – A protest action in which Morning Star independence flags were flown by a group of students on the Jayapura Science and Technology University (USTJ) campus in Abepura has ended with seven students being arrested by police.

Speaking by telephone with Tribune Papua on Thursday November 10, action coordinator Kaitanus Ikinia confirmed the rally and subsequent arrests.

“The demonstration earlier on the USTJ campus involved seven students and the agenda was still the same, rejecting the dialoged between Jakarta and Papua initiated by the Komnas HAM [National Human Rights Commission]”, he said.

In his explanation, Ikinia said that the seven students who held the action and were then arrested were Ernesto Matuan, Devio B Tekege, Ambrosius Elopere, Eko Ukago, Nobertus Dogopia, Matius Mabel and Andy You.

In addition to this, Ikinia said that the action was part of the commemoration of 22 years since the death of Papua independence figure Theys Hiyo Eluay.

“The protesters were giving speeches on campus conveying their aspirations and the police entered the USTJ campus grounds where the demonstration was and without any coordination, straight away forcibly broke it up”, he explained.

Ikinia admitted that it was indeed true that there were students who brought two Morning Star flags to the demonstration.

“The students who took part in the demonstration at the USTJ campus were more than seven people, but as soon as the police arrived the others ran out because they were chased, until there was a sound of teargas being fired”, he explained.

Ikinia added that as a result of the arrests it has increased tension on the USTJ campus.

Meanwhile during the peaceful demonstration the students made five demands which had to be implemented and followed up on.

First, they asked for an acknowledgment from all parties to commemorate November 10 as a national Papuan hero’s day.

Second, they oppose the state forcing the Papuan people to accept new autonomous regions (DOB) and the creation of three new provinces in Papua which were claimed unilaterally and only supported by certain rogue Papuan figures.

Third, they explicitly reject efforts by the state through Komnas HAM to conduct a dialogue because it is truly impossible for perpetrators to try perpetrators.

Specifically in the third point, they said that it is impossible for the dialogue to be fair because Papua is not a national but an international issue, so a resolution must be implemented through international mechanisms.

Fourth, they explicitly reject the involvement of rogue Papuan figures in the Indonesian initiated dialogue through Komnas HAM.

Fifth, they called on the state and the United Nations to officially acknowledge the right of self-determination for West Papua.

As of this article being published, Ikinia said that the arrested students were still being questioned at the Abepura sectoral police offices. (*)

Notes

West Papuan pro-independence leader Theys Hiyo Eluay was found dead in his car in November 2001 after attending a party thrown by the Indonesian Army’s Special Forces (Kopassus). Seven Kopassus soldiers were subsequently tried and found guilty of his murder and sentenced to short prison terms.

Recent efforts by the government’s National Human Rights Commission (Komnas HAM) to hold a dialogue with the Free Papua Movement (OPM) have been criticised for allegedly involving Papuan rebel groups cultivated by the TNI (Indonesian military). The effort has also been seen by many as a cynical attempt to counter mounting international criticism over ongoing rights abuses in Papua.

[Translated by James Balowski. The original title of the article was “Polisi Amankan Mahasiswa Kibarkan Bendera Bintang Kejora saat Demo di Kampus USTJ Jayapura”.]

Source: https://papua.tribunnews.com/2022/11/10/polisi-amankan-mahasiswakibarkan-bendera-bintang-kejora-saat-demo-di-kampus-ustj-jayapura ————————————————

ribune Papua – November 10, 2022

Indonesia now officially has 37 provinces as 3 new Papua autonomous regions inaugurated

By Coconuts Jakarta Nov 11, 2022 | 3:29pm Jakarta time

A map showing the three new provinces in Papua. Photo: Cabinet Secretariat

The Ministry of Home Affairs today inaugurated three new autonomous regions that formerly formed part of Papua province, raising the number of Indonesian provinces to 37.

Central Papua (Papua Tengah), Highland Papua (Papua Pegunungan), and South Papua (Papua Selatan) now join Papua and West Papua as the five provinces occupying the Indonesian half of New Guinea island.

Legislation for the three new autonomous administrative regions, aimed at improving governance and public services, was ratified by parliament in late June, after which wheels were set in motion for their formation.

Today, Home Affairs Minister Tito Karnavian appointed Apolo Safanpo as South Papua governor, Ribka Haluk as Central Papua governor, and Nikolaus Kondomo as Highland Papua governor. All three are serving in interim capacity until elections can be held in 2024.

“Today, on November 11, 2022, I, Tito Karnavian, as home affairs minister representing the president of the Republic of Indonesia, inaugurated the provinces of South Papua, Central Papua, and Highland Papua,” Tito said in the inauguration ceremony in Jakarta.

The formation of the three new provinces has not entirely been a cause for celebration, particularly for indigenous communities and secessionists on the island. Many see the move as a ploy by Jakarta to further divide the region and impose tighter control over the Papuan people and the resource-rich island.

Papua was a Dutch colony until the early 1960s, when it declared itself an independent nation in 1961. Neighboring Indonesia took control of the region by force in 1963 and officially annexed it with a UN-backed referendum in 1969 that was widely seen as a sham.

Rights activists slam Indonesia’s ‘baseless’ claims at UN

Minister tells UN rights body all cases of rights violations including those in restive Papua are investigated properly

 By UCA News reporter Published: November 11, 2022 11:58 AM GMT

Rights activists have criticized the Indonesian government for what they call baseless claims on rights issues at the UN Human Rights Council, including those related to the handling of the conflict in the Papua region.

Activists said various claims by the government in the 4th round of the Universal Periodic Review (UPR) session in Geneva on Nov. 9 are “contrary to the actual situation, which has also been reported by Indonesian civil society through an alternative report sent in March 2022.”

In the UPR session, Indonesia was represented by the Minister of Law and Human Rights, Yasonna H. Laoly.

Laoly claimed that the government always cooperates with human rights defenders, civil society organizations, journalists, and other civil elements to ensure the protection of human rights.

While on the issue of impunity, the government emphasized the provision of reparations for victims and that non-judicial mechanisms were complementary to judicial mechanisms and promised to properly investigate past gross human rights violations.

The same applies to the issue of human rights in Papua, where he said that most cases of violence in Papua have been investigated and the perpetrators have been punished.

Nurina Savitri, campaign manager for Amnesty International Indonesia stated that the government “did not provide complete information on the human rights situation” in Indonesia.

Regarding the Papua issue, she said, “the reality is that there are no cases involving security forces in Papua, including extrajudicial killings, which have previously been successfully investigated and tried in an independent court. “

“In the report, the government only conveys the situation in Papua from the perspective of infrastructure development, and welfare, even though at the same time violence continues. Of course, it is unfair to answer all this violence only with the jargon of infrastructure development,” she said in a statement.

She also highlighted the repeated violations of the Papuan people’s right to freedom of expression and peaceful assembly, as well as the government’s tendency to strengthen its security approach.

“The Indonesian government states that the international community must be able to distinguish between human rights issues in Papua and legal enforcement actions. The question is, has the Indonesian government been able to tell the difference?” Nurina said.

“Extrajudicial killings, silencing of expression, against Papuan civil society is not an act of law enforcement, it is a clear violation of human rights,” she added.

Yuli Langowuyo, executive director of the Franciscan’s Secretariat for Justice, Peace and Integrity of Creation in Jayapura Diocese of Papua, said, “the Indonesian government needs to seriously make efforts to fulfill human rights, including freedom of expression in the context of Indonesia and Papua.

For example, she highlighted the current revised draft of the Criminal Code which still includes an article on asking for permission to hold demonstrations.

“This is against the spirit of democracy in Indonesia and will be increasingly repressive. Moreover, in Papua, the number of violence due to restrictions on the right to free expression can increase,” she told UCA News on Nov. 11.

She also highlighted the government’s claims related to many infrastructure developments which are presented as means to assist Papua but do not address the political status of Papua within Indonesia.

She said the situation in Papua was mentioned by approximately nine countries in the UPR session for Indonesia.

“This means that the eyes of the international community are not closed to see the situation of injustice in Papua,” she said.

Papua is a former Dutch colony that declared independence in 1961. However, Indonesia annexed the territory through a referendum widely considered a sham.

A separatist movement for independence was born, prompting Indonesia to maintain a heavy military presence in the resource-rich but underdeveloped province.

This year 51 people were arrested and subjected to violence related to peaceful demonstrations, according to Amnesty International Indonesia. It reported that 95 civilians in Papua were victims of extrajudicial killings in 2018-2021.

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Police arrest 7 students for flying Morning Star flag at campus rally in Abepura

Tribune Papua – November 10, 2022

Aldi Bimantara, Jayapura — A protest action in which Morning Star independence flags were flown by a group of students on the Jayapura Science and Technology University (USTJ) campus in Abepura has ended with seven students being arrested by the police.

Speaking by telephone with Tribune Papua on Thursday November 10, action coordinator Kaitanus Ikinia confirmed the rally and subsequent arrests.

“The demonstration earlier on the USTJ campus involved seven students and the agenda was still the same, rejecting the dialoged between Jakarta and Papua initiated by the Komnas HAM [National Human Rights Commission]”, he said.

In his explanation, Ikinia said that the seven students who held the action and were then arrested were Ernesto Matuan, Devio B Tekege, Ambrosius Elopere, Eko Ukago, Nobertus Dogopia, Matius Mabel and Andy You.

In addition to this, Ikinia said that the action was part of the commemoration of 22 years since the death of Papua independence figure Theys Hiyo Eluay.

“The protesters were giving speeches on campus conveying their aspirations and the police entered the USTJ campus grounds where the demonstration was and without any coordination, straight away forcibly broke it up”, he explained.

Ikinia admitted that it was indeed true that there were students who brought two Morning Star flags to the demonstration.

“The students who took part in the demonstration at the USTJ campus were more than seven people, but as soon as the police arrived the others ran out because they were chased, until there was a sound of teargas being fired”, he explained.

Ikinia added that as a result of the arrests it has instead increased tension on the USTJ campus.

Meanwhile during the peaceful demonstration the students made five demands which had to be implemented and followed up on.

First, they asked for an acknowledgment from all parties to commemorate November 10 as a national Papuan hero’s day.

Second, they oppose the state forcing the Papuan people to accept new autonomous regions (DOB) and the creating of three new provinces in Papua which were claimed unilaterally and only supported by certain rogue Papuan figures.

Third, they explicitly reject efforts by the state through Komnas HAM to conduct a dialogue because it is truly impossible for perpetrators to try perpetrators.

Specifically in the third point, they said that it is impossible for the dialogue to be fare because Papua is not a national but an international issue, so a resolution must be implemented through international mechanisms.

Fourth, they explicitly reject the involvement of rogue Papuan figures in the Indonesian initiated dialogue through Komnas HAM.

Fifth, they called on the state and the United Nations to officially acknowledge the need for self-determination for West Papua.

As of this article being published, Ikinia said that the arrested students were still being questioned at the Abepura sectoral police offices. (*)

Notes

West Papuan pro-independence leader Theys Hiyo Eluay was found dead in his car in November 2001 after attending a party thrown by the Indonesian Army’s Special Forces (Kopassus). Seven Kopassus soldiers were subsequently tried and found guilty of his murder and sentenced to short prison terms.

Recent efforts by the government’s National Human Rights Commission (Komnas HAM) to hold a dialogue with the Free Papua Movement (OPM) have been criticised for allegedly involving Papuan rebel groups cultivated by the TNI (Indonesian military). The effort has also been seen by many as a cynical attempt to counter mounting international criticism over ongoing rights abuses in Papua.

[Translated by James Balowski. The original title of the article was “Polisi Amankan Mahasiswa Kibarkan Bendera Bintang Kejora saat Demo di Kampus USTJ Jayapura”.]

Source:

https://papua.tribunnews.com/2022/11/10/polisi-amankan-mahasiswakibarkan-bendera-bintang-kejora-saat-demo-di-kampus-ustj-jayapura

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Jokowi signals support for Prabowo, revives talk of Prabowo-Puan presidential ticket

Kompas.com – November 8, 2022

Fitria Chusna Farisa, Jakarta — Institute for Democracy and Strategic Affairs (Indostrategic) Executive Director Ahmad Khoirul Umam says that President Joko “Jokowi” Widodo’s statement on the chances of Defense Minister Prabowo Subianto winning the 2024 presidential elections

(Pilpres) reveals many political signals.

One of these is the strengthening of the discourse on a duet of Prabowo and ruling Indonesian Democratic Party of Struggle (PDI-P) leader Puan Maharani as presidential (capres) and vice presidential (cawapres) candidates in the coming elections.

“A positive signal bringing together the PDI-P and the Gerindra-PKB coalition will revive the schema of a Prabowo-Puan presidential and vice presidential ticket as something reasonable to consider”, Umam told Kompas.com on Monday November 7.

Umam suspects that Widodo’s statement was a signal of the PDI-P’s openness to joining a coalition with Prabowo’s Greater Indonesia Movement Party (Gerindra) and the National Awakening Party (PKB).

In August Gerindra declared the readiness of its general chairperson Prabowo to step forward as a presidential candidate. Meanwhile the seat for Indonesia’s number 2 position to accompany Prabowo remained empty.

According to Umam, the is a good possibility that the PDI-P will put forward its crown princess and daughter of PDI-P chairperson Megawati Sukarnoputri, Puan Maharani, to accompany Prabowo.

“Jokowi’s statement strengthened the political signals for the PDI-P to draw closer to the Gerindra-PKB coalition”, he said.

Umam is of the view that Widodo’s statement on the possibility of a Prabowo victory was not just political pleasantries.

The reason being that this is not the first time the number one person in Indonesia has signalled his support for Prabowo. Previously, Jokowi said that right from the start he has supported the Defense Minister.

Umam believes that with each statement Widodo is reinforcing his support for Prabowo to step forward as a presidential candidate. “Twice now Jokowi has made statements of support for Prabowo, on two consecutive occasions he has clearly asserted this position”, said Umam.

“If the statement was just a political nicety, clearly it would be unproductive and in fact would trigger negative sentiments from Prabowo’s supporters towards Jokowi who would be seen as offering false hope”, continued the Paramadina University lecturer.

Earlier, Widodo touched on the possibility of a Prabowo victory as a presidential candidate. During an event attended by Prabowo, Widodo said that he has already won two presidential elections and suspects that the next election will be won by Prabowo.

“Twice I won [the election] as mayor of Solo city [in Central Java].

Then, I was drawn to Jakarta, and won the governorship. Then, I also won the presidential elections twice. I apologies for [beating you twice], Pak [Mr] Prabowo”, said Widodo during his greetings at a United Indonesia Party (Perindo) anniversary event in the Kebon Sirih area of Central Jakarta on Monday.

“It looks like after this it will be Pak Prabowo’s turn”, he continued.

Widodo’s statement was greeted by boisterous laughter and applause by those present. Prabowo meanwhile, who had been seated with other guests in the front row, rose from his seat and gave a salute to Widodo.

Following the event, Widodo was asked by journalists about his support for Prabowo. The president said that it’s no problem if his remarks are seen as a signal of support for the Defense Minister as a presidential candidate.

“Yes, well it can be interpreted as a signal, but it’s also okay for me to just say it”, he said.

[Translated by James Balowski. The original title of the article was “Jokowi Lempar Sinyal Dukungan Capres, Wacana Duet Prabowo-Puan Menguat Lagi?”.]

Source:

https://nasional.kompas.com/read/2022/11/08/05500041/jokowi-lempar-sinyal-dukungan-capres-wacana-duet-prabowo-puan-menguat-lagi-

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Indonesia faces the music at UN human rights review  

https://www.thejakartapost.com/world/2022/11/10/indonesia-faces-the-music-at-un-human-rights-review.html

1) Indonesia faces the music at UN human rights review  


Speaking out: ‘Silenced’ by Yanto Gombo depicts the difficulty Papuans face in speaking out against oppression. (Courtesy of the Organizing Committee Biennale Jogja XVI Equator #6 2021)(Personal collection/Courtesy of the Organizing Commitee Biennale Jogja XVI Equator #6 2021)

A. Muh. Ibnu Aqil (The Jakarta Post)

 PREMIUM Jakarta   ●   Thu, November 10, 2022 

Indonesia was put on the defensive at a United Nations human rights review on Wednesday as countries spotlighted persistent political violence in Papua and anti-lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer (LGBTQ) policies, among other issues.

 In its national report for the UN Human Rights Council’s (HRC) 41st Universal Periodic Review, Indonesia highlighted its achievements in protecting human rights amid the COVID-19 pandemic, enacting pro-human rights legislation and supporting minority groups. 

The countries conducting the review at the UN headquarters in Geneva raised concerns about rights violations in Papua, citing reports of escalating violence, extrajudicial killings, enforced disappearances and restrictions on independent observers and the press. 

They recommended that Jakarta accept a visit of the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights to Papua and conduct investigations into extrajudicial killings and human rights violations in the restive region.

 In response, the Foreign Ministry’s director for human rights, Achsanul Habib, asserted that Papua was an integral part of Indonesia according to international law and that the region faced security challenges from “armed separatist groups”. “Critical infrastructure, human development, peace and security continue to be undermined by terrorist acts committed by these groups, who have intensified attacks against civilians and critical infrastructure since 2018,” Habib said on Wednesday, as broadcast by UN Web TV. 

Meanwhile, Law and Human Rights Minister Yasonna Laoly said President Joko “Jokowi” Widodo’s administration had prioritized accelerating development and welfare in Papua. 

Some countries recommended that Indonesia take steps to abolish the death penalty by placing a moratorium on state executions and by commuting the sentences of people on death row. 

They also encouraged the country to ratify the Second Optional Protocol to the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights. Minister Yasonna said the government had responded that the death penalty was still the law of the land and that debates in the executive and legislature had shown that most were in favor of keeping it.

 He noted that revisions to the Criminal Code under discussion in the legislature would introduce a “middle way” in which the death penalty would serve as an “alternative punishment” that could be commuted to life in prison following an evaluation 10 years after sentencing. 

“We hope that with this middle way, our approach to the issue of the death penalty can be accepted by international society,” Yasonna said during an online press conference streamed from Geneva on Wednesday. 

Several countries also raised concerns over “negative developments” for the LGBTQ community and recommended that Indonesia revise laws that enshrined discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation or gender identity. 

The UN review session, Indonesia’s fourth, also highlighted the country’s human rights achievements, citing the enactment of the 2022 Sexual Violence Law and the 2019 revision of the Marriage Law, which raised the minimum marrying age for women to 19 years old, equal to men. 

Human Rights Watch researcher Andreas Harsono said Indonesia had been “defensive” in response to concerns raised over Papua and had argued that armed resistance was nothing new in the region, as it had been going on since the 1960s. “That should not legitimize closing Papua off by making it harder for UN observers to visit,” Andreas told The Jakarta Post on Thursday. 

He added that Indonesia’s measures against armed resistance in Papua had been “excessive” and that the division of the area into five provinces would create new problems instead of settling them. Andreas also said the government’s reasoning for keeping death penalty was “unsatisfactory”. “However, the fact that giving out the death penalty would be harder [under the revised Criminal Code] is still a step forward. 

It’s not enough, but at least there is an awareness that law enforcement can make mistakes,” he said. Meanwhile, a group of civil society organizations urged the government to accept and follow up on all the recommendations it had received during the human rights review session. 

“The [review] session is an evaluation of accountability of Indonesia’s human rights commitments. This mechanism should not become a tool for Indonesia to create an image that Indonesia has been human rights friendly,” the group said in a statement.
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Child persecution in Keerom allegedly done by dozen soldiers: Komnas HAM Papua  

News Desk – Military Violence Against Papuan Children

 9 November 2022

Jayapura, Jubi – Head of the Papua Office of the National Commission on Human Rights (Komnas HAM Papua) Frits Ramandey on Tuesday, November 8, 2022, announced the results of the commission’s investigation into the persecution of three children in Keerom Regency. Komnas HAM Papua suspected the persecution was carried out by dozen of Indonesian Military (TNI) soldiers.

The investigation was conducted on October 29 and 30. “Based on the testimony of the three children victims, they were tortured by dozen of soldiers. They could not detail the number,” Ramandey said in Jayapura City, Tuesday.

Rahmat Paisei (15), Bastian Bate (13), and Laurents Kaung (11) were allegedly tortured at the Cartenz Task Force Post, in Yuwanain Village, Arso District on October 27, 2022. All three were abused by the soldiers using chains, coils of wire and water hoses they suffered injuries and had to undergo treatment at the hospital.

Ramandey said Komnas HAM Papua received a complaint from Rahmat’s parents, Jon Paisei, on October 28.

According to Ramandey, at first, two cockatoos disappeared from the Cartenz Task Force Post guarded by the Army’s Special Forces (Kopassus). The day after the birds’ disappearance, Laurents Kaung came to the post and offered a lory to the Kopassus soldiers. The lory Laurents was selling was allegedly stolen from elsewhere.

The soldiers detained Laurents and asked him about the origin of the lory. Laurents mentioned two other names, Rahmat Paisei and Bastian Bate. “After that, the soldiers detained the three of them and tortured them,” Ramandey said.

Ramandey said Rahmat Paisei was beaten by Kopassus soldiers at 7 a.m., and then sent home battered.  At around 7 p.m., Rahmat was picked up from his house, brought back to the post, and again persecuted until 12 a.m.

Ramandey said that according to Rahmat, he was stripped naked, handcuffed and then beaten with hands and several objects, among others a hose and thin wire. The persecution in the evening was witnessed by Rahmat’s parents.

“Rahmat’s parents hysterically asked the soldiers to stop beating their son but ignored,” Ramandey said.

Meanwhile, Bastian Bate claimed he was taken to the same post at around 7 p.m. He claimed to have also been beaten with cables, hoses, and hands by dozen soldiers. Bastian was discharged around midnight, with lash marks on several parts of his body.

Komnas HAM Papua also met Laurents Kaung. “He admitted to us that he did steal a bird but not at the Kopassus post. He stole a lory in another place and then brought it to the military post to sell for Rp 50,000. Instead, Laurents was assaulted and soaked in a pond,” Ramandey said.

Ramandey said Komnas HAM Papua had also met with the deputy commander of XVII/Cenderawasih Military Police, who said they had requested information from nine Kopassus members at the Cartenz Task Force Post. However, until now, the nine soldiers are still not named suspects. “As of November 5, the nine soldiers are still being questioned as witnesses,” said Ramandey.

He also explained the results of the commission’s meeting with the head of Marthen Indey Army Hospital in Jayapura City. The three children were treated at the hospital until October 31.

“The three victims were treated for five days at Marthen Indey Hospital. One of the victims, Rahmat Paisei, underwent CT scans of his head, abdomen, and his back. Rahmat experienced a lot of torture and suffered several wounds,” Ramandey said.

Furthermore, Komnas HAM Papua urges the Keerom regent to provide trauma healing in restoring the psychological condition of the three victims, as well as help them return to school. “These three children have dropped out of school,” said Ramandey.

According to Ramandey, the Keerom regent should facilitate a meeting between the victims and their families, the church, the tribal leaders, and Kopassus. The meeting is considered important because there is community trauma over the persecution case involving the Kopassus soldier. (*)